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To all the moms who feel like they have a seat reserved at the Mad Hatter’s table, we GET You! 

10 Books Everyone Told Me I Would Love — But I Hated

10 Books Everyone Told Me I Would Love — But I Hated

  1. American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis — I honestly wonder how anyone can actually enjoy this book. It makes my stomach turn to think that there are people who read this thing twice. I prefer the movie version which, while shocking and revolting, is over in less than two hours.
  2. Dune by Frank Herbert — The man had a great idea. He created a whole universe; I have to respect that. But the man also cannot write. The reviews are glowing but the boredom was real. Clunky, incoherent, uninteresting, unlikable characters — let’s just say it was a big disappointment.
  3. Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling — My expectations weren’t terribly high but this book was worse than I expected. It was an unfortunate pick in a book club that ultimately led to that group’s dissolution. The curse words felt purposefully added to push it into the “This-is-a-book-for-grown-ups-can’t-you-see-I’m-using-bad-words” realm. It was trite and predictable and a little silly.
  4. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess — This book was highly recommended to me by people whose opinion I value. I read it a long time ago (maybe I need to give it another shot?) but it did nothing for me. There are so many made up words and not enough context to understand them. I don’t get the hype?
  5. EVERYTHING I’ve read by Chuck Palahniuk (Rant, Invisible Monsters, Tell-All, and Fight Club) —Palahniuk is an idea man. He has lots of great ideas. But, I have a strong opinion: He can’t write. I lament each page of squandered storytelling potential. His books are so poorly written they are a chore to get through. Oh, I know, he’s so “edgy” and “cool” but his writing is still mediocre, at best.
  6. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky — This book was just not for me. Chbosky tried to cram everything into one little book: suicide, rape, death, violence, drugs, parties, fights, loneliness, and more without giving any one of these things the space that they need. For all the “emotion”, I just wasn’t feeling it — emotions weren’t explored. Show me, don’t tell me.
  7. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne — A classic had to make it on this list. It’s inevitable. When you hear “classic”, you have expectations. When you read a classic, you expect a certain caliber of book. This book has an excellent premise for its time. Unfortunately, it hasn’t aged well. It’s wordy and rambling, not much actually happens.
  8. Armada by Ernest Cline — I’m nerdy. I can get geeky, trust me, but this book is just goofy. Plot holes galore, predictable, corny, and very generic, this book fell short in so many ways. While Ready Player One was at least palatable and entertaining, this was not.
  9. Hollywood by Charles Bukowski — I can get down with some Bukowski with the best of them but he went too far in this one (or maybe he didn’t go far enough). Grumpy, mindless, self-absorbed drivel which, while endearing in some of his other books, did not work out in this one. This is one of his later works in life and it shows.
  10. The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells — One last classic made it onto my list. Can you tell I have a thing with books that are great ideas but fail in execution? Welp, it’s that again. This book is old — it was groundbreaking for its time but, it pains me to say this: it’s boring now. I want to enjoy books when I read them and this one seemed to drag on. I didn’t want to pick it up and read; I only wanted to finish it so that I could get it over with.

What did you think of my list?

What books have disappointed you? 
Leave comments below so I have something to read while I nurse my baby. 😘


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That Odd Mom is Taking an Extended Break

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